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Dog

My do is 13 years old and vomiting after...

Resolved • Response time 7 hours 56 minutes

24 Aug 2019

My do is 13 years old and vomiting after eating every time, Vet says that it could possibly be cancer, is there any food that will help her eat and will not hurt if she throws it up again?
JA: I'll do all I can to help. What sort of animal are we talking about?
Customer: dog Kelpie, not desexed, female, 13 years old. in healthy weight, but is loosing weight at the moment
JA: Hopefully it didn't make a mess. Did the dog eat anything unusual?
Customer: No she has been doing the throwing up for a week. everything that I give her, one to 5 minutes later she is throwing it up is there na brand of food that might be ok to feed here, I have tried eggs, chicken and rice
JA: What is the dog's name?
Customer: Missy
JA: Is there anything else the Veterinarian should be aware of about Missy?
Customer: vet that looked at here said there was nothing wrong, it could be cancer. Just wondering if any food would be ok for her to eat
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24 Aug 2019

Ask your own question
Customer reply
24 Aug 2019
I will call it more regurgitating as she tries to eat it after wards,, again and again.. Just like to know of any food that might be able to stop her doing that. She doesn't scoff her food. I have tried giving it in spoonfulls.
24 Aug 2019
Dog Specialist's response
24 Aug 2019
PitRottMommy
PitRottMommy
Veterinary Nurse

Hello, JACustomer. I have been a Veterinary Nurse for over 15 years. Rest assured that I will do my best to help you today. I am very sorry to see that you have not received a response to your initial question before now. I’m afraid I don’t have any control over your wait time, but I will be happy to assist you moving forward. Will you give me an update on how your companion is doing at this time so that I can move forward with addressing your concern? Have there been any changes since your original post?

24 Aug 2019
Customer reply
24 Aug 2019
no there is no changes
24 Aug 2019
Dog Specialist's response
24 Aug 2019
PitRottMommy
PitRottMommy
Veterinary Nurse

What type of cancer does your vet suspect?

When did your companion last have bloodwork?

Has your vet dispensed any medication to help with nausea or the vomiting?

Has an abdominal ultrasound been performed yet?

Have there been any changes to the diet? New food, including a change of flavors or protein source within the same brand? New treats? Bones? Have any table food or scraps been fed in the last few days (even if your pet regularly receives it)? Torn up toys or trash? Stressful changes to the environment? Addition of medication? Toxin ingestion? ​

24 Aug 2019
Customer reply
24 Aug 2019
No the vet didn't give me anything, my husband took her to the vet and he thought it was a waste of time to get any blood work done as the vet said that it is proberbly thoat cancer. No changes to diet, nothing new at all. do you think I should try again? I have tried table scraps the last two days, just trying to give her soft food so that it might go down easier, eg rice, cooked chicken and pork, gravey. but it hasn't changed anything
24 Aug 2019
Dog Specialist's response
24 Aug 2019
PitRottMommy
PitRottMommy
Veterinary Nurse

To clarify, has your companion had any symptoms up to this point or did this just start acutely?

Has she been willing to eat table scraps?

24 Aug 2019
Customer reply
24 Aug 2019
It started gradualy, maybe once or twice, I noticed her, but now it is everythime I give her any food at all. I haven't seen her drink anything in the last day. and last night she didn't even want to try to eat her food. It can happen with just a smacko or a biscuit, the only time it hasn't happened was at the vet when they were giving her liver treats.
24 Aug 2019
Customer reply
24 Aug 2019
Lastnights food was a raw egg and gravy ad a small amount of pork from our table
24 Aug 2019
Customer reply
24 Aug 2019
what food would you suggest?
24 Aug 2019
Dog Specialist's response
24 Aug 2019
PitRottMommy
PitRottMommy
Veterinary Nurse

First things first, if your vet has performed no diagnostics, there's no way that they can tell you that this is cancer. Cancer symptoms typically begin slowly and worsen over time (weeks to months). If this happened over a period of a few days, an ailment is more likely. Your vet should have impressed upon you the need for diagnostics with this age range of dog. Anytime a dog is over 8 years of age (their senior years), the potential for underlying ailment increases. Causes of vomiting/regurg can include liver disease, kidney disease, diabetes, pancreatitis, electrolyte imbalance, etc. As well, if your vet has provided no medication to help with the symptoms (even if diagnostics weren't performed), it's likely that the food is not going to solve the issue since ANY food you're giving right now is coming back up. I would strongly recommend a second opinion if your vet is unwilling to move forward with diagnostic care or, at very least, medication to help alleviate the symptoms.

I would recommend skipping food from the table as this can cause worsening of symptoms through GI upset. We can also see the development of other conditions like pancreatitis from feeding high fat foods like gravy and pork.

Failing this, I can give you some steps to take at home to help your companion’s stomach feel better and help to restore their appetite back to normal. However, if you do not see a marked improvement from your pet or you see worsening of symptoms, they absolutely must be examined by a veterinarian. If you need help finding a location that can see your pet (even just to keep on hand), I can help. I’ll need you to provide your location as the website does not give us this.

It often helps to give medication to calm the stomach and a bland diet with higher fiber a few hours later once the medication has been given time to work. This can help to reduce the instance of nausea/vomiting, restore/improve the appetite, avoid or address changes in the stool, help to move ingested items through the GI tract, etc.

You can give regular pepcid (famotidine) every 12-24 hours if no other medications are being given that we haven’t discussed. This should help with GI symptoms. You can find the dosing information available here: https://www.petcarerx.com/medication-guides/famotidine-for-pet-stomach-ulcers/1116 For this, you can visit any human pharmacy and buy the OTC brand name Pepcid, or you can use the cheaper, off-brand “famotidine” that’s available. If your companion is avoiding taking medication, you will likely need to use a pilling technique like this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-P6NfbxeLX0 (this video is of a dog as it shows the finer details of how to complete the action, this method can be used in dogs, cats and other mammals needing oral medications). Be sure to give a few teaspoons of water following any dry pilling to help flush the pill down to the stomach. [Note: once symptoms have resolved for at least 48 hours, please discontinue the famotidine.]

2 hours after you have given a dose of famotidine, the time needed for the medication to begin working, you can offer a small amount of bland diet. To make the bland diet, you’ll combine white or brown rice, boneless, skinless chicken breast and sufficient water for cooking in a stock pot (note: if your companion is allergic to chicken you can use a protein source they can have such as ground turkey, a filet of salmon, etc). Avoid skin and bone. Use no salt, butter, oils, spices or other enticing additives. Boil on medium until it turns to mush and the meat is easily flaked. To avoid nausea, start with small amounts to begin with and offer the amount every 2-4 hours. A few teaspoons to start is typically sufficient and you can work your way up every 2-4 hours in incremental increases until you’re sure no vomiting will be seen. If your companion requires a more palatable food, try using or adding in pureed baby food in chicken, turkey and similar flavors. Avoid those that contain onion or garlic in the ingredient panel. You want to work up to feeding exclusively until at least 3 days following the resolution of symptoms. After this, work on slowly switching back to the regular food that your companion typically eats over a 10 day period. My recommendation is a 10% switch every day. Day 1: 10% new food, 90% old food; Day 2: 20% new food, 80% old food; Day 3: 30% new food, 70% old food, etc. This slow switch process should minimize any risk of GI upset from changing food.

It has been my honor to assist you today, I hope this information has been helpful as I take a great deal of pride in my work. I will be standing by if you have any questions I did not address, please feel free to reply and I will respond further. Please be sure to leave a rating or issue thanks before signing off today so that I know you received my response above. It’s imperative for this to be done for the website to compensate me for helping you.

24 Aug 2019
Customer reply
25 Aug 2019
Have been able to feed small amounts to her and she has kept it down. You have conviced my husband that we can go to the vet, as he has noticed weight loss today.
25 Aug 2019
Customer reply
25 Aug 2019
Missy Had to be put to sleep. She developed breathing problems and it was discovered that there was a tumour in her lungs. Thankyou for your help
25 Aug 2019
Customer reply
25 Aug 2019
looking back I can see that it was an ongoing issue that gradualy worsened. but I just thought that they were small things that she got over
25 Aug 2019
Dog Specialist's response
25 Aug 2019
PitRottMommy
PitRottMommy
Veterinary Nurse

I'm so glad to hear that she improved on your watch, but my heart is broken hearing that you had to euthanize her. I am so sorry for your loss. Thank you for letting me know.

25 Aug 2019
Customer reply
25 Aug 2019
Newish question. I now have a 5 year old dog that has not had a day away from her mother since she was born. She always adored her mother, how do I help her understand that her mother is not with us?
25 Aug 2019
Dog Specialist's response
25 Aug 2019
PitRottMommy
PitRottMommy
Veterinary Nurse

If she's been euthanized and her body is still available, I would suggest letting her visit her mother post-mortem. Many dogs understand death much better than we realize and giving her a chance to say goodbye before burial or cremation may be easiest on everyone. Other than that, I would continue on as you have without making a general fuss over her being the only dog. If you see that she's stressing, mix up the routine. If you feed in her kennel in the kitchen, move her kennel to the dining room. Take her out an hour earlier or later than usual. Find something to do with her extra time such as going to doggy daycare or out for a professional groom every few weeks. Hire a dog walker to come spend time with her.

Most dogs do not suffer depression as we do. They live in the moment more than humans and this makes overcoming situational changes much different than it does for us (often easier). You may see no changes at all for your remaining companion.

25 Aug 2019
Customer reply
25 Aug 2019
thankyou We will try that. Thankyou
25 Aug 2019
Dog Specialist's response
25 Aug 2019
PitRottMommy
PitRottMommy

You're welcome and good luck.

PitRottMommy
PitRottMommy
Veterinary Nurse
Avg. question only AU$19
15 yrs experience in vet med, 8 in emergency med. Founder of a non-profit animal rescue
25 Aug 2019
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